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Review: “1917” – Sam Mendes

It was the exact moment when lead actors George MacKay and Dean-Charles Chapman appeared on screen, that there was no escape from facing World War I yourself, because the whole atmosphere drags the audience into a claustrophic swirl which takes your breath. Award winning director Sam Mendes (“American Beauty”) based his newest picture on a

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Review: Honey Boy – Alma Har’el

“My whole work requires and is motivated by trauma reminders!” Otis (Lucas Hedges) hisses at his therapist in the first act of Honey Boy. The names are different and some details were omitted, but the true nature of his real life trauma becomes readily apparent. Shia LaBeouf wrote this screenplay during his 10 week court

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Review: “Last Christmas” – Paul Feig

Every year just in time for Christmas there is no escaping – if you want or not you have to voluntarily surrender to the classic “Last Christmas” by Wham !, which is played on the radio on endless loop until the holidays and mercilessly nests in the ear canals. “Bridesmaids” and “Ghostbusters” director Paul Feig

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“Unknown Gems”: 3 Underrated Movies I Love

If you find yourself thumbing through your streaming services and saying “I’ve seen that” over and over again, we’ve got you covered. From time to time our writers are going to recommend some hidden gems and films that mabye didn’t hit big when they were initinally released, but are well worth watching regardless. I focused

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“Tenet” Review: The Brain-Bending Magic of Cinema is Back

Few names are more synonymous with modern cinema than Christopher Nolan. The acclaimed British auteur has amassed an enormous empire of epic studio action blockbusters with the craft of an arthouse film, focusing on the technical mastery of his craft and pushing the envelope of non-linear storytelling with a persistent obsession with time. “Memento” is

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Review: “So long, My Son” – Xiaoshuai Wang

Years ago Yaojun and Liyun’s son Xing died in a tragic accident, while his best friend Hao has to live with the guilt. For decades, Wang’s film has been a knotted web in the middle of Chinese one-child politics, jumping from scene to scene from past to present. The personal influence in the story is

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Review: “Ma” – Tate Taylor

Thrilling, oppressive, psychological – that is the model that the company Blumehouse is standing for. The production company has proven in recent years that it hasn’t yet shaken up the cinematic landscape enough, but that a new wave of horror film has opened up. In this new genre representative Olivia Spencer is supposed to keep

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Review: Capone – Josh Trank

There is a fine line between haunting and laughable and Josh Trank’s “Capone” toes that line bunglingly. Some of the images certainly transport the viewer into a wicked nightmare, as Al “Fonz” Capone (Tom Hardy) waddles his way through a dreamscape rife with cascading jet black and steel gray balloons, violent acts of savagery, ravenous

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“I’m Thinking of Ending Things” Review: Charlie Kaufman Returns with Another Existential Masterpiece

Few filmmakers have fallen farther down the rabbit hole of existentialism than Charlie Kaufman. The screenwriter/director has penned some of the most thought-provoking and original films ever made, having been nominated for two of his scripts and one of his directorial efforts at the Academy Awards, as well as winning Best Original Screenplay for 2004’s

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“Lux Æterna” Review: Demented Descent Into Hell is Gaspar Noé’s Most Hysterical Film Yet

Gaspar Noé is a filmmaker that warrants strong reactions. Whether it be causing 250 walkouts at the 2002 Cannes Film Festival with “Irrevérsible”, or filming unsimulated sex scenes in his 3D film “Love”, or filming a 42-minute-long unbroken take for “Climax”, Noé takes immense pleasure in causing a whirlwind of provocation and emotional turmoil in

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Review: „Kajillionaire“ – Miranda July

Especially at the beginning, “Kajillionaire” is reminiscent of the films of Wes Anderson – when, for example, the family of three crooks repeatedly sneaks crouched past a site fence to escape their landlord who is waiting for his money. Or when Old Dolio (Evan Rachel Wood), who only got her unusual name because she wanted

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Nomadland: The Languor of the Biggest Oscar Contender

A while ago, Fern (Frances McDormand) and her husband lived in a small American town based around industry. After the local gypsum factory’s shutdown, the town practically ceased to exist. And during this painfully chaotic situation, Fern’s husband died, leaving her forlorn, jobless, houseless (as she likes to call herself). She starts living in her

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Und Morgen Die Ganze Welt: Why Is Germany’s Pick For The Oscars Dangerous For The Public?

Compared to countries with a polarised media landscape, i.e. a political spectrum ranging from the extreme left to the extreme right, reflecting an equally polarised society (e.g. the USA, the UK), Germany offers a system wherein all major media are clustered around the media-political centre (Reuters Institute Digital News Report, 2017, p.20-21). The weight of

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